Training For Loose Leash Walk

For the best control, keep the leash and collar on your puppy  when he is out of the crate and have him supervised at all times.   Corrections can be done immediately and he won't learn the habit of running away when you reach to handle him.  Remove the leash and collar before returning him to the crate to avoid hanging accidents.

YOU WILL NEED:


Nylon Leash And Collar

(Chain, pinch  or harness collars are not needed when the method below is taught correctly)

Puppy's Favorite Treats

Make walks a pleasure for yourself as well as your new puppy with these simple steps.  The most important tip is patience!  This is not something that will be learned over night.  Set aside specific training time to teach this lesson so that you won't be in a rush to have your puppy obey you.

The first step to teaching a loose leash walk will be to teach your puppy to stand nicely without pulling on his leash.  Have some small treats in your hand, relax and put your puppy on your left side.  If he runs out and pulls to the end of the leash, don't move or try to pull him back in to you.  Wait for your puppy to look back, then, return to you.  When he does, reward him.

When he is doing this consistently, say "heel" then step off with your left foot.  If he runs out and pulls to the end of the leash, again, don't move or try to pull him back in to you.  When he returns to you, start again.  Eventually your puppy will learn that by not pulling, the walk continues, which is a reward in itself.   If you stop every time he pulls and are consistent, your puppy will finally understand what is expected and will walk nicely with you.

A more controlled heel can be achieved by building on what your puppy already knows and shortening your leash until he is walking with his shoulder at your side.  This will take more time and is achieved more quickly if your puppy/older dog has learned how to pay attention to you.

Once your puppy is responding well and paying attention, check out these helpful videos by Chad Hines from Willow Creek Kennels to move your puppy into a more advanced heel. If you are not comfortable using a clicker you can use the word "yes" instead to mark correct behavior.

Authored And Copyrighted By Janet Wright

All Rights Reserved, Unauthorized Use Prohibited

Training To Leave It / Take It

For the best control, keep the leash and collar on your puppy  when he is out of the crate and have him supervised at all times.   Corrections can be done immediately and he won't learn the habit of running away when you reach to handle him.  Remove the leash and collar before returning him to the crate to avoid hanging accidents.

YOU WILL NEED:

Nylon Leash And Collar

Additional Long Leash Or Rope

Puppy's Favorite Treats Or Toy

TRAINING REQUIREMENTS:

Master Sit / Stay

The goal with this lesson will be to teach your dog to leave an object that is not supposed to be touched by him.  By teaching your dog this lesson at a young age he will learn what he can and cannot touch with his mouth.

The first step is to teach your puppy to turn his head away from an object when you say "leave it."  Start off by having your puppy on the leash and your having one small bite-sized treat in each hand.   While sitting in front of your puppy,  open both of your hands (with a treat in each hand,) with palms up and hands close together.  Show your puppy the treats, whichever treat he goes for first, close your fist and say "leave it" at the same time.  Lure the other treat over to the side to get his head to turn, say "take it" at the same time he moves his head then let him eat the treat.  

Once your puppy consistently turns his head when the command of "leave it" is given, your next step will be to lure the treat up to your eyes so that he looks at you.  This is teaching your puppy to look at you for permission before being allowed to pick something up.  Lengthen the times between the command of "leave it" and "take it," before giving the reward. 

Step two will be to have your puppy sit.  Drop your leash and step on it.  Drop a treat in front of him, saying "leave it" at the same time. If he lunges for it say "ah ah" and place him back in to a sit.  Once he stops and waits, pick up the treat and say "take it" and let him go for the treat.  Again, lengthen the times between the command of "leave it" and "take it" before giving the reward. 

Step three will be to have your puppy sit.  Drop a treat in front of him, saying "leave it" at the same time.  Take a step back, lure your puppy to you and offer him a treat, this redirects his attention to you and off of what he needs to leave alone.  Again, lengthen the times between the command of "leave it," having him come to you, sitting, then receiving the reward.

Especially when your puppy is young, make sure to keep treats in your pocket to make it worth his while to always obey you.  Remember to make it more desirable to receive the treat than to do the wrong action that you are trying to stop.

This command is really handy when you are out for a walk and your puppy goes for objects that he shouldn't touch such as sticks, toys, dead things, etc.  It also can be used if he tries to go after another animal, child or adult, bicycle, car, etc.  Always be ready to reward your puppy for his good behavior!

Authored And Copyrighted By Janet Wright


All Rights Reserved, Unauthorized Use Prohibited

Train Your Puppy To Not Jump Up

For the best control, keep the leash and collar on your puppy  when he is out of the crate and have him supervised at all times.   Corrections can be done immediately and he won't learn the habit of running away when you reach to handle him.  Remove the leash and collar before returning him to the crate to avoid hanging accidents.

YOU WILL NEED:

Nylon Leash And Collar

Puppy's Favorite Treats

TRAINING REQUIREMENTS:

Master Sit/Stay

Master Sit And Greet


After times of separation, your puppy will want to jump up on you to say "hi!, I missed you!".  In his world, that is his natural way of greeting other dogs, this isn't just something he is doing to annoy you, this is dog language.  Just like everything else that you want your puppy to learn, he has to be trained to respond differently to what he naturally does. 

Whenever your puppy jumps up on you, turn to the side, completely ignore him and walk away.  Do not make eye contact, say anything or try to push him out of the way.  In a dog's eyes, these are all types of rewards that say that you are acknowledging their behavior.  Give him time to calm down and get all four feet on the floor.  Only after he is calm, should you greet your dog.  Make it low-key with a low voice and slow, calming motions.  If he starts to jump up again, repeat the process.  If this has become a habit it may take a while to break but if you are consistent this will take care of the problem.

Authored And Copyrighted By Janet Wright

All Rights Reserved, Unauthorized Use Prohibited

Front Door Etiquette

For the best control, keep the leash and collar on your puppy  when he is out of the crate and have him supervised at all times.   Corrections can be done immediately and he won't learn the habit of running away when you reach to handle him.  Remove the leash and collar before returning him to the crate to avoid hanging accidents.

YOU WILL NEED:

Nylon Leash And Collar

Pupperoni Treats

Spray Bottle Of Water Or Bitter Apple Spray

TRAINING REQUIREMENTS:

Master "Quiet"

Master Sit/Stay

Master Sit And Greet

In a domestic situation or in the wild, when a family member or pack member returns, the natural reaction for dogs/pack members is to joyfully jump up and greet each other or to bark and possibly attack to defend their territory. When someone knocks at your front door, these are the typical reactions that an untrained dog will exhibit. Your goal with this lesson will be to train your puppy to react in a mannerly way by sitting and staying when someone is welcomed into your home.


Step one will be to have the nylon leash and collar on your puppy, with the leash dragging on the floor (having the leash handy will help you control your dog better).  The person doing the training will have the spray bottle of either water or bitter apple spray in hand and dog's favorite treats in a handy pocket.


Step two will be for the person that is doing the training to walk to the front door and knock on the inside as if someone is outside knocking at the door. If your puppy barks, say "good boy!" and pet your dog to acknowledge that he has warned that there is a stranger at the door. If barking continues, say "quiet". If the barking continues, either spray water directly into your puppy's face or direct bitter apple spray into his mouth saying "quiet!" at the same time then tell your dog to sit. Once he is sitting and staying, open the front door. If he gets up, close the door immediately and reposition him in to the sit/stay. Opening the door is the reward for his sitting and staying. Once he goes through these steps successfully and stays with the door open, quietly praise your dog and give him a treat. Build the amount of time sitting with the door open then rewarding and releasing with an "o.k." to let him move from his position (it's important to remember that if you let him choose when to get up, he will not sit and stay when actual guests come through the door. Always remember to release your dog with the "o.k." command).


Once your dog has mastered the above steps, he is ready to move to having an actual "visitor" knock on the front door. After explaining the training steps, have a friend or family member knock on the outside of the front door. The steps will be the same as when you were knocking on the door, on the inside. Tell your dog to sit, then open the door. If he moves from position (and he probably will because he sees a person outside now), close the door and reposition him into a sit. Open the door again. 

Once he stays with the door open and the visitor standing outside, have your visitor approach your dog for the sit and greet. The trainer holds the treat while the "visitor" greets your dog. If he gets up, remove the treat and reposition him into the sit. Offer the treat again until the "visitor" stands up and moves away, you can then release your dog with your "o.k. command.


Keep in mind that this is a series of steps of learning, "Quiet", Sit/Stay, and Sit And Greet.  These need to be learned one at a time, then connected together to achieve the desired result.

This lesson will also be handy when you open the front door to walk out, he will not bolt out the door but will quietly wait for your "o.k." to move out of position.

Authored And Copyrighted By Janet Wright

All Rights Reserved, Unauthorized Use Prohibited

Train Your Puppy To "Down"

For the best control, keep the leash and collar on your puppy  when he is out of the crate and have him supervised at all times.   Corrections can be done immediately and he won't learn the habit of running away when you reach to handle him.  Remove the leash and collar before returning him to the crate to avoid hanging accidents.

YOU WILL NEED:

Nylon Leash And Collar

Puppy's Favorite Treats

Teaching your puppy to lie down is one of the most important commands that he will learn.  If your dog is in the down position, it discourages him from jumping on people and helps him to relax when he is overly excited. 

It's easiest to teach the down command after he has learned the sit command.  Start by having small treats in your hand and having your puppy sit.  Hold a treat between your thumb and forefinger with your palm facing down.  With the treat near your dog's nose, slowly lower your hand straight down towards the floor.  This will lure his head down and cause him to slide into the down position.  As soon as he hits the floor completely say, "down".  At first, reward with the treat immediately, saying "yes" at the same time.  Make him stay briefly,  then say "o.k."to release.   Start off by having him hold it for five seconds, then build to longer and longer periods of time. 

On rare occasions, there is a puppy that will not respond to the above method.  If this is the case, try this.  With leash on, have your puppy sit while you are kneeling on the floor.  Position yourself to one side, hold a treat up to the puppy's nose.  The next part you can do one of two ways.  First, put your arm under his front legs, lift the legs up and pull forward into the down.  The other method is to grasp one leg and pull forward while you are lowering the treat to the floor.  While he is going down, say, "down" at the same time.  Make him stay briefly, say "o.k.," release, then reward.  As above, start off by having him hold it for five seconds, then build to longer and longer periods of time. 

Authored And Copyrighted By Janet Wright

All Rights Reserved, Unauthorized Use Prohibited

Train Your Puppy To Come On Call

For the best control, keep the leash and collar on your puppy  when he is out of the crate and have him supervised at all times.   Corrections can be done immediately and he won't learn the habit of running away when you reach to handle him.  Remove the leash and collar before returning him to the crate to avoid hanging accidents.

YOU WILL NEED:

Nylon Leash And Collar

Additional Long Leash Or Rope

Puppy's Favorite Treats Or Toy

Many accidents and the tragedy of a lost puppy can be avoided by teaching the come on call.  If you start teaching this command at a young age, an entire range of problems can be totally avoided. 

Start off by keeping your puppy on the leash at all times, inside and outside (when out of his crate).  If your puppy knows that you can always reach him, he won't learn how to run away from you or learn how to dodge your hand as you reach for him. 

Remember, always let your puppy know that it is a positive thing to come to you, every time!  Keep your voice excited and happy when calling your puppy and always have a treat on hand to reward his good behavior.  There will be stages of independence and times when he will try you.  An angry voice and punishment is counter productive and will actually teach your puppy to not come to you.  The utmost patience is needed at this time to reward your puppy when he finally does come to you.  If you are angry, walk away and come back when you are more calm.

Keep your treats on hand for rewards.  While on the leash, say your puppy's name, show him a treat and walk backwards, luring your puppy to you.  When he starts to move towards you, say the word "come" at the same time then offer your treat with lots of praise. Eventually he will understand, and will start to come consistently. When you reach this stage, have him learn to come while inside, off of the leash. If he starts to ignore, go back to the leash training. When he comes consistently inside, start working on the come on call in a fenced in yard with a long leash. There will be distractions so you will have to get him coming to you consistently on the long leash first. When he comes every time on the long leash, start off leash training in your enclosed outside area. Eventually, you will be able to take your older puppy to a safe large outside area to try the recall off leash. Avoid a lot of distractions at first until you are confident that he has will obey every time. It is really excellent to reach this point, and even have him learn to come from far away just by hearing your whistle, awesome!

Check out this helpful video by Chad Hines of Willow Creek kennel.

Authored And Copyrighted By Janet Wright

All Rights Reserved, Unauthorized Use Prohibited

Train Your Puppy Not To Bite

For the best control, keep the leash and collar on your puppy when he is out of the crate and have him supervised at all times.   Corrections can be done immediately and he won't learn the habit of running away when you reach to handle him.  Remove the leash and collar before returning him to the crate to avoid hanging accidents.

YOU WILL NEED:

Nylon Leash And Collar

Spray Bottle With Water

Bitter Apple Brand Spray (available at pet supply stores)

Puppy's Favorite Toy

PUPPIES - First of all, it feels good to a puppy when he chews, just like a baby likes to teethe.  Have a favorite toy on hand to redirect to when he tries to bite at or chew on you. Some puppies are more dominant and that is their way of trying to be in charge, in that case, there are two methods that can be used to train your puppy not to bite.

Keep a mist spray bottle of water with you while handling your puppy.  Within two seconds of trying to bite at you, direct a spray of water to his face and say "no bite" at the same time then redirect your puppy to his favorite toy after he recovers.  When he goes to chew on it say, "good boy!"  If your puppy happens to love water and he thinks that the spray bottle is just a game, you can use the Bitter Apple method below.

Keep a bottle of Bitter Apple Brand Spray with you while handling your puppy.  Within two seconds of trying to bite at you, direct a spray of the product into his mouth and say "no bite" at the same time then redirect your puppy to his favorite toy after he recovers.  When he goes to chew on it say, "good boy!"  Designed to deter puppies from chewing on whatever it is sprayed on, this is safe for them to ingest.  We have tried different brands and this one seems to work the best. 

Both of these methods are excellent when used consistently and really get their attention!  Eventually you will notice him only licking at you or just wagging his tail and lifting his head to be petted. Tell him what a good puppy he is when he does good!

OLDER PUPPIES AND ADULTS - Biting is a dangerous problem in an older puppy and adult dog.  Okefeild Acre's recommends a thorough vet exam to rule out possible health issues then consulting an experienced trainer at these ages.

Authored And Copyrighted By Janet Wright

All Rights Reserved, Unauthorized Use Prohibited

Train To Stop Barking Outside Of The Crate

For the best control, keep the leash and collar on your puppy  when he is out of the crate and have him supervised at all times.   Corrections can be done immediately and he won't learn the habit of running away when you reach to handle him.  Remove the leash and collar before returning him to the crate to avoid hanging accidents.

YOU WILL NEED:

Nylon Leash And Collar

Spray Bottle With Water

Bitter Apple Brand Spray (available at pet supply stores)

Most of us like to know when someone is at our door or to be alerted when something outside isn't quite right.   When your puppy alerts you to these things, acknowledge the fact that he has done good by saying "good boy!" and pet him.  Now that you have been alerted and he has been rewarded, it is time for your puppy to let you take care of the situation.   Dogs like the security of knowing that you are in charge so that they are safe.  If they don't feel secure, they will continue barking.  Use the method below to let your puppy know that you are the leader.

With leash on, keep your spray bottle with you at all times when your puppy is out of the crate.  Right when he goes go bark, spray the face saying "quiet" at the same time.  This has to be done quickly and every time he barks.   If the water doesn't faze him, you can use the bitter apple sprayed directly into the mouth, they don't like this!  This method works excellent when done consistently.

Authored And Copyrighted By Janet Wright

All Rights Reserved, Unauthorized Use Prohibited

How To Feed Puppies

NUTRITION

Okefeild Acres recommends a quality adult or all life stages formula dog food for growing puppies.  Increasing evidence gathered by vets and breeders is showing that high protein/calcium puppy foods are causing a dramatic increase in joint and hip problems.  When a puppy receives high levels of protein and higher levels of calcium, contained in puppy formula foods, they can grow too quickly and their soft tissue cannot keep up with the rapid bone growth.  

When puppies are fed high protein/calcium, the bones grow faster than the surrounding soft tissue, causing the feet to turn off to the side, which is very painful.  If the protein/calcium is lowered and an adult maintenance food is fed to the affected puppy before the growth plates close, this problem can sometimes be reversed, depending on how closed the plates are.  Lowering the protein/calcium will not cause your puppy to be smaller as an adult, he will just mature to his genetic size at a slower rate.

 

SUGGESTED SUPPLIES

 

  • Life's Abundance All Life Stages Dry Dog Food for English Cream Golden Retrievers, Mini and Standard Goldendoodles - Lower protein promotes slow growth for healthy joint development - Order Here

 

  • Life's Abundance Canned Food - Going to a new home can be stressful, a small spoon of canned food tempts puppies to eat when they go off their food - Order Here

 

  • Life's Abundance Fish Oil Supplement - Promotes brain development for higher intelligence and develops healthy skin and beautiful shiny coat! - Order Here

 

  • Life's Abundance Wellness Supplement - Boosting the immune system with wellness supplement helps puppy thrive, grow and maintain excellent health throughout their life! - Order Here

 

  • Buttermilk Powder – to prevent tear staining in light colored Goldendoodles, add 1 tsp 2X day to their food - Available Here On Amazon

 

  • Reverse Osmosis, filtered or distilled water – if you have hard water, the excess minerals can cause tear staining and kidney stone formation. Use mentioned water if necessary.

 

FEEDING INSTRUCTIONS

 

Plan on feeding your new puppy three times a day for the first few months, then twice a day by the time they are one year old.  Give recommended amount by weight, divided equally for the two or three meals.  You should be able to feel a nice layer of fat over the ribs.  Keep an eye on maintaining healthy weight, it's best to be a little bit on the lean side to encourage healthy joint growth, yet not too thin to where he is not thriving and growing well.

To determine how much food to order, there are 73 cups of food in a 20 lb. bag.  We recommend this size bag so that the food maintains freshness by going through the bag more quickly:

Puppies will eat about 1/2 a cup, 3 times a day, a 20 pound bag will last 6 plus weeks

A 50 lb dog will eat about 1 cup 2 times a day, a 20 pound bag will last a 50 pound dog approximately 5 weeks. 

Add the Life's Abundance Wellness Supplement and Omega Oil capsule to the first meal of the day.  Add 1 tsp buttermilk to each meal if you have a light colored Goldendoodle, to prevent tear stains. Adding a small spoonful of Life's Abundance canned food to each meal will encourage a healthy appetite (this will not be needed once your puppy becomes used to living in their new home.)

The last meal of the day should not be any later than 6:00 which will give your puppy time to eliminate before bedtime.  

Treats are a welcome way for your new puppy to be encouraged in their training.  We have found that our dogs love Life's Abundance Treats, which is what our trainers will be using to train your new puppy.  Give small bite size pieces so that they look forward to their rewards. 

Check out our "Common Dog Toxins" page to see what kind of foods are harmful to your dog.  It really is best for dogs to not be fed "people food" as it is not specially formulated for dogs and can cause bad eating habits and obesity, not to mention causing bad habits at dinner time!  Feed your dog their special mixture when you eat so they can be trained to eat their own food and not beg.