Training For Loose Leash Walk

For the best control, keep the leash and collar on your puppy  when he is out of the crate and have him supervised at all times.   Corrections can be done immediately and he won't learn the habit of running away when you reach to handle him.  Remove the leash and collar before returning him to the crate to avoid hanging accidents.

YOU WILL NEED:


Nylon Leash And Collar

(Chain, pinch  or harness collars are not needed when the method below is taught correctly)

Puppy's Favorite Treats

Make walks a pleasure for yourself as well as your new puppy with these simple steps.  The most important tip is patience!  This is not something that will be learned over night.  Set aside specific training time to teach this lesson so that you won't be in a rush to have your puppy obey you.

The first step to teaching a loose leash walk will be to teach your puppy to stand nicely without pulling on his leash.  Have some small treats in your hand, relax and put your puppy on your left side.  If he runs out and pulls to the end of the leash, don't move or try to pull him back in to you.  Wait for your puppy to look back, then, return to you.  When he does, reward him.

When he is doing this consistently, say "heel" then step off with your left foot.  If he runs out and pulls to the end of the leash, again, don't move or try to pull him back in to you.  When he returns to you, start again.  Eventually your puppy will learn that by not pulling, the walk continues, which is a reward in itself.   If you stop every time he pulls and are consistent, your puppy will finally understand what is expected and will walk nicely with you.

A more controlled heel can be achieved by building on what your puppy already knows and shortening your leash until he is walking with his shoulder at your side.  This will take more time and is achieved more quickly if your puppy/older dog has learned how to pay attention to you.

Once your puppy is responding well and paying attention, check out these helpful videos by Chad Hines from Willow Creek Kennels to move your puppy into a more advanced heel. If you are not comfortable using a clicker you can use the word "yes" instead to mark correct behavior.

Authored And Copyrighted By Janet Wright

All Rights Reserved, Unauthorized Use Prohibited

Training To Leave It / Take It

For the best control, keep the leash and collar on your puppy  when he is out of the crate and have him supervised at all times.   Corrections can be done immediately and he won't learn the habit of running away when you reach to handle him.  Remove the leash and collar before returning him to the crate to avoid hanging accidents.

YOU WILL NEED:

Nylon Leash And Collar

Additional Long Leash Or Rope

Puppy's Favorite Treats Or Toy

TRAINING REQUIREMENTS:

Master Sit / Stay

The goal with this lesson will be to teach your dog to leave an object that is not supposed to be touched by him.  By teaching your dog this lesson at a young age he will learn what he can and cannot touch with his mouth.

The first step is to teach your puppy to turn his head away from an object when you say "leave it."  Start off by having your puppy on the leash and your having one small bite-sized treat in each hand.   While sitting in front of your puppy,  open both of your hands (with a treat in each hand,) with palms up and hands close together.  Show your puppy the treats, whichever treat he goes for first, close your fist and say "leave it" at the same time.  Lure the other treat over to the side to get his head to turn, say "take it" at the same time he moves his head then let him eat the treat.  

Once your puppy consistently turns his head when the command of "leave it" is given, your next step will be to lure the treat up to your eyes so that he looks at you.  This is teaching your puppy to look at you for permission before being allowed to pick something up.  Lengthen the times between the command of "leave it" and "take it," before giving the reward. 

Step two will be to have your puppy sit.  Drop your leash and step on it.  Drop a treat in front of him, saying "leave it" at the same time. If he lunges for it say "ah ah" and place him back in to a sit.  Once he stops and waits, pick up the treat and say "take it" and let him go for the treat.  Again, lengthen the times between the command of "leave it" and "take it" before giving the reward. 

Step three will be to have your puppy sit.  Drop a treat in front of him, saying "leave it" at the same time.  Take a step back, lure your puppy to you and offer him a treat, this redirects his attention to you and off of what he needs to leave alone.  Again, lengthen the times between the command of "leave it," having him come to you, sitting, then receiving the reward.

Especially when your puppy is young, make sure to keep treats in your pocket to make it worth his while to always obey you.  Remember to make it more desirable to receive the treat than to do the wrong action that you are trying to stop.

This command is really handy when you are out for a walk and your puppy goes for objects that he shouldn't touch such as sticks, toys, dead things, etc.  It also can be used if he tries to go after another animal, child or adult, bicycle, car, etc.  Always be ready to reward your puppy for his good behavior!

Authored And Copyrighted By Janet Wright


All Rights Reserved, Unauthorized Use Prohibited

Train Your Puppy To Not Jump Up

For the best control, keep the leash and collar on your puppy  when he is out of the crate and have him supervised at all times.   Corrections can be done immediately and he won't learn the habit of running away when you reach to handle him.  Remove the leash and collar before returning him to the crate to avoid hanging accidents.

YOU WILL NEED:

Nylon Leash And Collar

Puppy's Favorite Treats

TRAINING REQUIREMENTS:

Master Sit/Stay

Master Sit And Greet


After times of separation, your puppy will want to jump up on you to say "hi!, I missed you!".  In his world, that is his natural way of greeting other dogs, this isn't just something he is doing to annoy you, this is dog language.  Just like everything else that you want your puppy to learn, he has to be trained to respond differently to what he naturally does. 

Whenever your puppy jumps up on you, turn to the side, completely ignore him and walk away.  Do not make eye contact, say anything or try to push him out of the way.  In a dog's eyes, these are all types of rewards that say that you are acknowledging their behavior.  Give him time to calm down and get all four feet on the floor.  Only after he is calm, should you greet your dog.  Make it low-key with a low voice and slow, calming motions.  If he starts to jump up again, repeat the process.  If this has become a habit it may take a while to break but if you are consistent this will take care of the problem.

Authored And Copyrighted By Janet Wright

All Rights Reserved, Unauthorized Use Prohibited

Front Door Etiquette

For the best control, keep the leash and collar on your puppy  when he is out of the crate and have him supervised at all times.   Corrections can be done immediately and he won't learn the habit of running away when you reach to handle him.  Remove the leash and collar before returning him to the crate to avoid hanging accidents.

YOU WILL NEED:

Nylon Leash And Collar

Pupperoni Treats

Spray Bottle Of Water Or Bitter Apple Spray

TRAINING REQUIREMENTS:

Master "Quiet"

Master Sit/Stay

Master Sit And Greet

In a domestic situation or in the wild, when a family member or pack member returns, the natural reaction for dogs/pack members is to joyfully jump up and greet each other or to bark and possibly attack to defend their territory. When someone knocks at your front door, these are the typical reactions that an untrained dog will exhibit. Your goal with this lesson will be to train your puppy to react in a mannerly way by sitting and staying when someone is welcomed into your home.


Step one will be to have the nylon leash and collar on your puppy, with the leash dragging on the floor (having the leash handy will help you control your dog better).  The person doing the training will have the spray bottle of either water or bitter apple spray in hand and dog's favorite treats in a handy pocket.


Step two will be for the person that is doing the training to walk to the front door and knock on the inside as if someone is outside knocking at the door. If your puppy barks, say "good boy!" and pet your dog to acknowledge that he has warned that there is a stranger at the door. If barking continues, say "quiet". If the barking continues, either spray water directly into your puppy's face or direct bitter apple spray into his mouth saying "quiet!" at the same time then tell your dog to sit. Once he is sitting and staying, open the front door. If he gets up, close the door immediately and reposition him in to the sit/stay. Opening the door is the reward for his sitting and staying. Once he goes through these steps successfully and stays with the door open, quietly praise your dog and give him a treat. Build the amount of time sitting with the door open then rewarding and releasing with an "o.k." to let him move from his position (it's important to remember that if you let him choose when to get up, he will not sit and stay when actual guests come through the door. Always remember to release your dog with the "o.k." command).


Once your dog has mastered the above steps, he is ready to move to having an actual "visitor" knock on the front door. After explaining the training steps, have a friend or family member knock on the outside of the front door. The steps will be the same as when you were knocking on the door, on the inside. Tell your dog to sit, then open the door. If he moves from position (and he probably will because he sees a person outside now), close the door and reposition him into a sit. Open the door again. 

Once he stays with the door open and the visitor standing outside, have your visitor approach your dog for the sit and greet. The trainer holds the treat while the "visitor" greets your dog. If he gets up, remove the treat and reposition him into the sit. Offer the treat again until the "visitor" stands up and moves away, you can then release your dog with your "o.k. command.


Keep in mind that this is a series of steps of learning, "Quiet", Sit/Stay, and Sit And Greet.  These need to be learned one at a time, then connected together to achieve the desired result.

This lesson will also be handy when you open the front door to walk out, he will not bolt out the door but will quietly wait for your "o.k." to move out of position.

Authored And Copyrighted By Janet Wright

All Rights Reserved, Unauthorized Use Prohibited